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Four graphs to show how the UN spent $17 bn

UN vehicles delivering supplies
UN vehicles delivering supplies (Omar/UNICEF)

The operational arm of the United Nations, UNOPS, has just published its annual statistical report on UN procurement, examining the spending on goods and services around the world by 36 UN agencies and organisations.

It reveals that a total of $17 billion was spent in 2015, a rise of $400 million on the preceding year. But it also reveals that repeated calls for more procurement to come from the least developed nations have not yet been heeded, despite gains for some developing countries. There was an increase of two percent in total procurement costs in 2015, but an eight percent decrease in procurement from least developed nations, compared to 2014.

These graphs show some of the major trends:

 

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