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Timeline of violence in 2009

A Baghdad police station bombed on 9 May 2007. Violence in Iraq has reached intolerable levels
(DVIC)

With just a week left until all US forces must leave Iraq’s major cities, violence in the war-battered country appears to be on the rise once again. More than 100 people have been killed in bombings and shootings in Iraq in the past three days.



Most of the 133,000 US troops left in Iraq will henceforth be in large bases outside Baghdad and other major cities in line with an agreement which will see all US troops out of Iraq by 2011. After 30 June, the US army will only be allowed to intervene in violent incidents in Iraqi cities if specifically called upon to do so by the Iraqi authorities.



According to the US Defense Department on 22 June, 4,317 US soldiers have died in Iraq since the US-led invasion in 2003, of whom 3,454 died as a result of hostile action.



The number of Iraqis killed in this period are hotly disputed for political reasons, and depending on who exactly is being counted and on the accuracy of the information gathered.



Iraqi deaths have been caused by US-led forces, Iraqi forces, foreign insurgents, sectarian violence and indirectly by war-related effects on their health, on food security and sanitation. Estimates range from 100,000 to well over a million.




Photo: DVIC
Many civilians were killed when a suicide bomber drove a car loaded with explosives into a bus (file photo)

Timeline



22 June 2009: A bomb in Husseiniya vegetable market on northern outskirts of Baghdad killed five. Parked car bomb in central Baghdad's Karrada District killed five. Suicide bomber killed himself and seven others outside west Baghdad’s Abu Ghraib municipal council building.



20 June: A suicide truck bomb killed 73 and wounded about 150 others outside a mosque in Kirkuk, 250km north of Baghdad.



12 June: A gunman killed the head of parliament's biggest Sunni Muslim bloc and five other people at a mosque in west Baghdad.



10 June: 33 killed and 70 wounded in a car bombing in the town of Batha, west of Nasiriyah in Dhiqar Province.



8 June: A bomb attached to a minibus killed seven people and wounded 24 others at a bus terminal in southern Baghdad.



3 June: 9 killed and 31 wounded by a bomb planted in a cafe in southwest Baghdad.



21 May: A suicide bomber killed 12 and wounded 25 in a market in Baghdad's southern Doura District. Three US soldiers also killed in the attack. In Kirkuk, a suicide bomber killed seven people and wounded eight.



20 May: At least 41 people killed and 82 wounded in a car bombing in the Shula District of northwest Baghdad.



6 May: A truck bomb killed 10 people and wounded 37 others in a vegetable market in Doura District, southern Baghdad.



29 April: At least 51 killed and many more wounded in a twin car bomb attack in Baghdad’s Sadr City.



24 April: At least 55 killed, including 20 Iranian pilgrims, by two suicide bombers outside the Al-Kadhim Shia shrine in Baghdad.


Al Jazeera report on rising violence in Iraq

Watch larger version in YouTube

23 April: A suicide bomber killed 56, mostly Iranian pilgrims, in a restaurant near Muqdadiyah town, 80km northeast of Baghdad. A woman suicide bomber also killed 28 in an attack on police in central Baghdad.



6 April: Car bombings in mainly Shia districts of Baghdad kill at least 34 people.



26 March: At least 20 killed by a car bomb near a Baghdad market.



23 March: At least 25 killed by a suicide bomber in Jalawla, northeast Baghdad.



10 March: A suicide bomber kills at least 33 tribal leaders and army officers outside the town hall in Abu Ghraib, west of Baghdad.



8 March: A suicide bomber killed 28 at a Baghdad police academy.



13 Feb: A female suicide bomber killed 35 pilgrims, mainly women and children, near central city of Hilla.



4 Jan: A female suicide bomber killed 35 pilgrims at a Baghdad religious procession.



2 Jan: At least 23 killed in a suicide attack in Yussufiyah, south of Baghdad.



(Sources: Agence France-Presse; Reuters - Alertnet and Iraqi police reports)



ed/cb


This article was produced by IRIN News while it was part of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Please send queries on copyright or liability to the UN. For more information: https://shop.un.org/rights-permissions

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