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Casamance

Atrocities in nearby Liberia and Sierra Leone have stolen the regional headlines over the years, but the low-intensity separatist struggle in Casamance is West Africa’s longest-running civil conflict

Casamance Senegal
Casamance Senegal

Three decades of on-and-off separatist conflict in Senegal's southern region of Casamance have killed thousands of people, displaced tens of thousands more, crippled the rural-based economy and turned large tracts of territory into no-go zones due to landmines.

A ceasefire was declared last year by an important rebel leader, but even if it holds, grievances and resentment linger and underlying socio-economic problems threaten to consign another generation of Casamançais to living like second-class citizens in one of Africa's supposed beacons of democracy.

Special Features

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Between war and peace
Tom Burke/Flickr

Between war and peace

Senegal has a proud musical heritage, but in the southern region of Casamance they too often sing of pain, suffering and conflict without end.

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Landmines in Senegal
jbdodane/Flickr

Why landmines keep on killing in Senegal

“Demining in the Casamance region could be done in six months.” It is a bold claim, but Chris Natale speaks from experience garnished with frustration.

Film: No War, No Peace

No War No Peace in Casamance, Senegal

A largely unknown conflict goes on in Senegal.

Timeline: Casamance

Back to Forgotten Conflicts

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