1. Home
  2. Africa
  3. East Africa
  4. Central African Republic

UN agency donates $18-million equipment to hospitals

The UN Population Fund (UNFPA) has donated obstetrical equipment worth US $18.2 million to hospitals in Central African Republic (CAR), which were looted during a rebellion in October 2002 to March 2003, state-owned Radio Centrafrique reported on Tuesday.

UNFPA representative Basile Tabasch said the agency would oversee the distribution of the equipment to hospitals in the towns of Bossangoa, Bozoum, Mongoumba, Grimari and Bambari.

The donation comprises mattresses, basins, scales, stethoscopes, speculums, iron plates, tape measuremes, sphygmomanometers (blood pressure cuffs), clinical thermometers and gloves.

The radio reported that Health Minister Nestor-Mamadou Nali thanked the UN agency for the donation, saying: "We'll make good use of these materials because they are exactly what we need."

He added that the equipment would reinforce intervention capacities of obstetrical services.

Several hospitals, mainly those in the northwest of the country, were looted during the six-month rebellion led by the current CAR leader Francois Bozize. The war ended on 15 March 2003 when Bozize ousted President Ange-Felix Patasse. Since then, social services in the northwest are slowly returning to normal, with government and humanitarian officials gaining access to the area.

Nali said the UNFPA donation would help reduce maternal and infant mortality.


This article was produced by IRIN News while it was part of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Please send queries on copyright or liability to the UN. For more information: https://shop.un.org/rights-permissions

Share this article
Join the discussion

Help make quality journalism about crises possible

The New Humanitarian is an independent, non-profit newsroom founded in 1995. We deliver quality, reliable journalism about crises and big issues impacting the world today. Our reporting on humanitarian aid has uncovered sex scandals, scams, data breaches, corruption, and much more.

 

Our readers trust us to hold power in the multi-billion-dollar aid sector accountable and to amplify the voices of those impacted by crises. We’re on the ground, reporting from the front lines, to bring you the inside story. 

 

We keep our journalism free – no paywalls – thanks to the support of donors and readers like you who believe we need more independent journalism in the world. Your contribution means we can continue delivering award-winning journalism about crises.

Become a member of The New Humanitarian today

Become a member of The New Humanitarian

Support our journalism and become more involved in our community. Help us deliver informative, accessible, independent journalism that you can trust and provides accountability to the millions of people affected by crises worldwide.

Join