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Humanitarian Technology

The promises and risks of new technology in disaster response.

A UNHCR app allows field workers in Lebanon to check refugee entitlements via barcode Ben Parker/IRIN
A UNHCR app allows field workers in Lebanon to check refugee entitlements via barcode

New technologies are continually changing the way emergency relief efforts are carried out. From mobile money to drones, satellite monitoring to biometrics, the humanitarian aid system is adapting to the ongoing revolution in communications and computing.

As our coverage illustrates, the humanitarian community is occasionally an innovator, more often a late adopter. Success stories of efficiency and effectiveness are mixed with tales of false dawns and unintended consequences. All, though, may help inform future efforts.

 
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