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Photo Feature: Libya's forgotten displaced

Four years after fleeing the town of Tawergha, many Libyans are still waiting to go home. Houssain, 86, feels like his time is running out.
(IRIN)

During Libya’s 2011 revolution, the town of Tawergha was used as a military base by pro-Gaddafi forces. In a revenge attack, Misratan militias entered the town and burned it to the ground, causing some 30,000 Tawerghans to flee.

Four years later, nearly all of those displaced from the town remain in limbo, stuck in camps or staying with relatives, not knowing when they might be able to go home, and if they do, what they will find there.

IRIN brings you this photo feature from a Tawergha displacement camp 90km from the capital Tripoli, in a remote location in the mountainous region of Tarhuna, where aid rarely reaches and hope is wearing thin. 

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