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Photo Feature: Burundi's Endless Exodus

A Burundian woman suffering from suspected cholera lies in the health clinic at Lake Tanganyika Stadium in Kigoma, Tanzania, on 19th May 2015.
A Burundian woman suffering from suspected cholera lies in the health clinic at Lake Tanganyika Stadium in Kigoma, Tanzania (Jessica Hatcher/IRIN)

Of the thousands who have fled in recent weeks amid protests against President Pierre Nkurunziza’s plan to run for a third term and a related attempted coup, more than half have arrived in neighbouring Tanzania.

Many of the refugees have made the same hasty journey before. Hundreds of thousands of Burundians fled their homeland during the country's 12-year civil war, only to return after the 2005 peace agreement. One woman waiting at Kagunga to catch a boat to Kigoma in Tanzania said she plied this exact route in 1993 and along with other refugees spoke warmly of their earlier years there. 

Click here to see IRIN's photo feature on the issue.

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