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Why this Indonesian fisherman risked it all

Blast fishing in Sulawesi

Blast fisherman, Indonesia
Blast fisherman, Indonesia (Florian Kunert/IRIN)

On the Indonesian island of Kaledupa, fishermen like Lino create makeshift bombs out of plastic soda bottles to catch greater numbers of fish.

Blast Fishing in Indonesia

Florian Kunert/IRIN
Blast Fishing in Indonesia

Blast fishing can yield up to ten times more than traditional fishing but it decimates fish populations and destroys everything in its wake. More than seventy percent of Indonesia’s coral reef is severely deteriorated due to human activity, and blast fishing is one of the leading causes of this devastation. But there just aren't as many fish as there used to be and Lino needs to find a way to feed his family.

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