The New Humanitarian welcomes new CEO Ebele Okobi.

Find out more.
  1. Home
  2. Asia
  3. Indonesia

Why this Indonesian fisherman risked it all

Blast fishing in Sulawesi

Blast fisherman, Indonesia Florian Kunert/IRIN
Blast fisherman, Indonesia

On the Indonesian island of Kaledupa, fishermen like Lino create makeshift bombs out of plastic soda bottles to catch greater numbers of fish.

Blast Fishing in Indonesia

Blast fishing can yield up to ten times more than traditional fishing but it decimates fish populations and destroys everything in its wake. More than seventy percent of Indonesia’s coral reef is severely deteriorated due to human activity, and blast fishing is one of the leading causes of this devastation. But there just aren't as many fish as there used to be and Lino needs to find a way to feed his family.

Share this article

Get the day’s top headlines in your inbox every morning

Starting at just $5 a month, you can become a member of The New Humanitarian and receive our premium newsletter, DAWNS Digest.

DAWNS Digest has been the trusted essential morning read for global aid and foreign policy professionals for more than 10 years.

Government, media, global governance organisations, NGOs, academics, and more subscribe to DAWNS to receive the day’s top global headlines of news and analysis in their inboxes every weekday morning.

It’s the perfect way to start your day.

Become a member of The New Humanitarian today and you’ll automatically be subscribed to DAWNS Digest – free of charge.

Become a member of The New Humanitarian

Support our journalism and become more involved in our community. Help us deliver informative, accessible, independent journalism that you can trust and provides accountability to the millions of people affected by crises worldwide.

Join